The ultimate guide to Twitterspeak, from the FBI, of course!

The ultimate guide to Twitterspeak, from the FBI, of course (PDF) http://ow.ly/yfgov

FBI Twitter shorthand list

The FBI’s List of Twitter shorthand

Hello 2014, But First Goodbye 2013

happy new year 2014

Happy New Year! I hope 2014 is a happy, healthy and successful year for you and your families. But before moving forward, here are a few updates on what went on since the summer when work needs distracted me from this blog: Read more of this post

LinkedIn 201 Basics: How To Share Thought Leadership [Infographic]

Four easy steps to building your online subject matter reputation by sharing informative articles on LinkedIn

Four easy steps to building your online subject matter reputation by sharing informative articles on LinkedIn

No Time For Social Media? Why You Should Make Some

Pocket watch, savonette-type. Italiano: Orolog...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I came across this article, How to Make Space for Social Media,  published on Harvard Business Review by Alexandra Samuel, Vice-President of Social Media at Vision Critical, a market research technology provider (@awsamuel). She had me from the first sentence:

Few professionals were sitting at their desks in 2004, eyeing the empty slots in their calendars and wishing that somebody would just invent a new way of communicating to fill those long and lonely minutes.

Nice. And, something I wanted to share in a way more robust than a simple tweet or LinkedIn update, which is why I’ve based this entry on her’s.

In the article she takes an honest look not at not just the reasons why it makes sense for today’s executives to be active on social media, but why it’s worth giving up other activities in order to find the time to participate. It’s powerful stuff. She supported one of my recurring mantras regarding social business for companies — hire a social media professional to lead the way — but goes on to address the individual executive’s reason for doing so.

Here are the four questions she says execs need to ask themselves in order to realize the value spending (more) time on social networks:

  1. What am I learning from social media?
  2. Who am I meeting through social media?
  3. Who am I reaching through social media?
  4. How am I replenished by social media?

Please read the article for the reasoning behind the questions. There’s a lot to learn — and to teach others resistant to the idea of devoting time and energy to social media — that you will be able to use.

After all, the best way to get senior management “buy-in” for your social media initiatives is to first explain the “why” before the “what, how and when”.

RIOT – You Can’t Hide, So Don’t Even Think About Running

Science is dangerous; we have to keep it most carefully chained and muzzled.” ― Aldous HuxleyBrave New World 

The choice for mankind lies between freedom and happiness and for the great bulk of mankind, happiness is better.” ― George Orwell1984

Sense a theme here?

Raytheon, the fifth largest defense contractor in the world has developed software that scours the internet and social networks and creates a profile capable of “tracking people’s movements and predicting future behaviour by mining data from social networking websites.” (source: Guardian UK). named RIOTRapid Information Overlay Technology (see video).

In other words, it quickly identifies who you and your friends are; where you’ve been; what you’ve done and by analyzing all of that data can predict where you’re going and what you’re going to do. It amplifies the concept of GAFA (pronounced, “gaff-ah”). Simply put, if you are active online, GAFA knows just about everything about you already: Google knows everything you’ve searched on including medical conditions; movie times; travel plans and more; Apple knows all about your musical taste and podcast subscriptions; Facebook is all about your friends and family, relationships, photos, etc.; and Amazon knows all about the things you research before you buy and your ultimate choices.

Now, add to that all of the GPS related services now commonplace on smartphones and tablets. Check-ins on Facebook, Foursquare and other location based services; and actual images of every photo you’ve uploaded online. All of that information — about you — fed into a system that analyzes, categorizes and theorizes to predict your future activity.

Privacy (whether real or an illusion) is the price we pay as a modern society for the benefits we enjoy every day from the Internet and smartphone technology. Want to go back to directionless maps? How about online dinner reservations, flower ordering or any of the other day-to-day activities that made our lives easier. As Huxley wrote, “for the great bulk of mankind, happiness is better

My advice? Don’t sweat it. Live a good honest life and you won’t have to worry about what breadcrumbs you’re leaving on the Web. But also keep up-to-date on Internet privacy law. Every society needs the gadfly — one who upsets the status quo by constantly questioning it, and so I belong to the Electronic Frontier Foundation which constantly monitors court cases and legislation that threatens to reduce online freedoms. I don’t agree with every stand they take, but I value the role they play.

None of this is new, by the way. Back when I worked for AOL during its heyday members constantly accused us of reading every Instant Message posted (we weren’t). Back then, we were processing more IMs daily than the pieces of mail handled by the U.S. Postal Service (and this was back when the Post Office was still big).

But if information is indeed power, then technology that quickly analyzes and predicts the behavior of individuals or groups is a powerful — or dangerous — tool.

But for most of us, the old adage rings true:

You wouldn’t worry so much about what other people think about you, if you realized how little they did.

It’s Marketing; It’s Social Media; It’s Social Media Marketing

Social Media Marketing

Social Media Marketing

I’ve written before about who “owns” social media in any given organization (see: Who Owns Social Media? Ultimate Answer: The Opposites) During my decade at AOL (Community and Social Messaging), we worked in the Product dept., although viewing “product” as the home of social media may have been  unique to the situation, both in the company (one of the first online community hubs) and the time (mid ’90s — mid ’00s). At BusinessWeek, it was the digital dept and for sure, what better place for a digital tool like social media to live? But at Bloomberg LP it was the Communications dept and that certainly made sense and where I am now, KPMG LLP, it resides in marketing.

So, I can tell you from experience, there are arguments for social media being based in whichever department I (or perhaps, you) work in at the time. As stated in my prior post it the goal should be that social media live everywhere in a modern organization and so usually I try to stay departmental-agnostic. So I am always on the lookout for some function-based thought leadership piece that makes a good case for why social is a key tool for them.

That brings us to this article,’12 From ’12: The Ultimate List Of The Year’s Top Marketing Lessons‘ on Forbes written by Lisa Arthur (CMO of Aprimo), where she lists her key marketing developments from 2012:

1) Marketing is transforming 2) It’s all about engagement 3) Accountability means transparency
4) Social is a strategy 5) Mobile is moving to the top of the agenda 6) Showrooming is here to stay
7) Zombies live among us 8) Technology rules 9) If you don’t have expertise, partner with someone who does
10) We’re stronger together 11) It’s never too late to start changing the game 12) Stay agile

It struck me that, without exception, what she is saying about marketing is also true about social media. Read more of this post

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